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All the World

Universalism, Particularism and the High Holy Days

Edited by Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, PhD

6 x 9, 288 pp, Hardcover
978-1-58023-783-3

                 

Large Print edition also available from ReadHowYouWant.com

 

 

Why be Jewish?
A fascinating dialogue across denominations of the High Holy Days and their message of Jewish purpose beyond mere survival.

Almost forty contributors from three continents—men and women, scholars and poets, rabbis and theologians, representing all Jewish denominations and perspectives—examine the tension between Israel as a particular People called by God, and that very calling as intended for a universalist end, furthering God’s vision for all the world, not just for Jews alone. This balance of views arises naturally out of the prayers in the High Holy Day liturgy, coupled with insights from philosophy, literature, theology and ethics.

This fifth volume in the Prayers of Awe series provides the relevant traditional prayers in the original Hebrew, alongside a new and annotated translation. It explores the question “Why be Jewish?” in a time when universalist commitment to our planet and its people has only grown in importance, even as particularist questions of Jewish continuity have become ever more urgent.

About the Prayers of Awe Series

A multi-volume series designed to explore the High Holy Day liturgy and enrich the praying experience for everyone—whether experienced worshipers or guests who encounter Jewish prayer for the very first time.

 

Praise for Lawrence A. Hoffman’s Work

“Hoffman uncovers the depth of holiness and life affirmation.… In a seamless web, he weaves together past and present, ancient sacred scripture and contemporary spiritual reflection.”

Rabbi Irving (Yitz) Greenberg, president, the Jewish Life Network; author, The Jewish Way

“When the glorious history of American synagogues in the twenty-first century is written, there is no doubt that Hoffman will be acknowledged as one of the primary architects of its transformation, revitalization and health.”

Rabbi Daniel Freelander, vice president, Union for Reform Judaism

“Offers great wisdom about the way religious rituals can help people make sense of their lives.”

Rev. Ruth Duck, associate professor, Worship Art, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

“Rabbi Hoffman’s book will enrich your soul.”

Rabbi David Wolpe, Sinai Temple, Los Angeles; author, Why Be Jewish?

“Hoffman’s precision … [is] evident…. Worth reading … meticulous.”

Jewish News of Greater Phoenix

“If the quality of [this] … work is continued in future ones, Hoffman has another award-winning series on his hands…. Excellent.”

Reporter (Binghamton, NY)

“Lawrence Hoffman shows us how, by understanding the dynamic between a person and God and among people gathered for prayer, the length of our communal reach can exceed the sum of our individual efforts. In doing so, he helps us discover our collective heart.”

Rabbi Jack Moline, Agudas Achim Congregation, Alexandria, Virginia

Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, DHL, an inspiring speaker and educator, holds the Abner and Roslyn Goldstine Dean’s Chair of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies and is vice president of American Jewish University in Los Angeles. He is a member of the philosophy department, supervises the Miller Introduction to Judaism Program, and mentors Camp Ramah in California. He is also dean of Zacharias Frankel College in Potsdam, Germany, ordaining rabbis for the European Union. A regular columnist for the Huffington Post, he is author of many articles and books, including God of Becoming and Relationship: The Dynamic Nature of Process Theology and Passing Life’s Tests: Spiritual Reflections on the Trial of Abraham, the Binding of Isaac.

Rabbi Tony Bayfield, CBE, DD (Cantuar), is professor of Jewish theology and thought at Leo Baeck College in London. He is also president of the Movement for Reform Judaism in the United Kingdom. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Will Berkovitz is the CEO of Jewish Family Service of Seattle, where he oversees nine program areas, from refugee resettlement to emergency services. He leads JFS in mobilizing philanthropic, volunteer, and advocacy support to meet the needs of those who are most vulnerable in the Seattle community. Before JFS, he was senior vice president and rabbi in residence at Repair the World, where he developed innovative partnership initiatives with organizations across the United States. He is a contributor to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (Jewish Lights).

Dr. Annette M. Boeckler is lecturer for liturgy at Leo Baeck College in London and manager of its library. She studied theology, Jewish studies, and Ancient Near Eastern Studies in Germany and Switzerland and chazzanut both privately (with cantor Marcel Lang, z”l, and cantor Jeremy Burko) and at the Levisson Instituut in Amsterdam. She contributed to All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Dr. Erica Brown is a writer and an educator. She is a faculty member of the Wexner Foundation, an Avi Chai Fellow, and the recipient of the Covenant Award. She is author of Inspired Jewish Leadership: Practical Approaches to Building Strong Communities, a National Jewish Book Award finalist; Spiritual Boredom: Rediscovering the Wonder of Judaism; and Confronting Scandal: How Jews Can Respond When Jews Do Bad Things (all Jewish Lights); and coauthor of The Case for Jewish Peoplehood: Can We Be One? (Jewish Lights), Return, In the Narrow Places, Leadership in the Wilderness, and Happier Endings. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights). Her articles have appeared on the Newsweek/Washington Post website “On Faith.”

Rabbi Lawrence A. Englander, CM, DHL, DD, has been rabbi of Solel Congregation of Mississauga, Ontario, since its inception in 1973. He is author of The Mystical Study of Ruth, former editor of the CCAR Journal, and a contributor to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (both Jewish Lights).

Lisa Exler is a senior program officer in the experiential education department at American Jewish World Service (AJWS). She contributed to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Shoshana Boyd Gelfand received her rabbinic ordination in 1993 at The Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. She has served as chief executive of the United Kingdom Movement for Reform Judaism and prior to that was vice president of the Wexner Heritage Foundation in New York. Currently she is director of JHub, an operating program of the London-based Pears Foundation. She contributed to All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Laura Geller, senior rabbi of Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills, was one of the first women to be selected to lead a major metropolitan synagogue. She was twice named one of Newsweek’s 50 Most Influential Rabbis in America and was featured in the PBS documentary Jewish Americans. She is the author of many articles in books and journals, and was on the editorial board of The Torah: A Women’s Commentary. She is a fellow of the Corporation of Brown University from where she graduated in 1971. Ordained by Hebrew Union College in 1976, she is the third woman in the Reform Movement to become a rabbi.

Rabbi Edwin Goldberg, DHL, serves as coordinator of the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR) editorial committee on the forthcoming CCAR machzor. He has a doctorate in Hebrew letters from Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion and is the senior rabbi at Temple Sholom of Chicago. He is author of Saying No and Letting Go: Jewish Wisdom on Making Room for What Matters Most (Jewish Lights). He contributed to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (both Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Andrew Goldstein, PhD, is the president of Liberal Judaism, UK, the rabbinic advisor to the European Union for Progressive Judaism, and coeditor of Machzor Ruach Chadashah. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Dr. Joel M. Hoffman lectures around the globe on popular and scholarly topics spanning history, Hebrew, prayer, and Jewish continuity. He has served on the faculties of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, and Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. He is author of And God Said: How Translations Conceal the Bible’s Original Meaning and In the Beginning: A Short History of the Hebrew Language, and has written for the international Jerusalem Post. He contributed to all ten volumes of the My People’s Prayer Book: Traditional Prayers, Modern Commentaries series, winner of the National Jewish Book Award; to My People’s Passover Haggadah: Traditional Texts, Modern Commentaries; and to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Lawrence A. Hoffman, PhD, has served for more than three decades as professor of liturgy at Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion in New York. He is a world-renowned liturgist and holder of the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Chair in Liturgy, Worship and Ritual. He has written and edited many books, including My People’s Prayer Book: Traditional Prayers, Modern Commentaries, winner of the National Jewish Book Award; Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, the first volume in the Prayers of Awe series; and he is coeditor of My People’s Passover Haggadah: Traditional Texts, Modern Commentaries, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. He is a developer of Synagogue 3000, a transdenominational project designed to envision and implement the ideal synagogue of the spirit for the twenty-first century.

Rabbi Walter Homolka, PhD, DHL, is the rector of the Abraham Geiger College for the training of rabbis, the executive director of the Zacharias Frankel College, and a professor of modern Jewish thought at the School of Jewish Theology of the University of Potsdam in Germany. He is the author of many books, including Jesus Reclaimed: Jewish Perspectives on the Nazarene, and coauthor with Hans Kung of How to Do Good & Avoid Evil: A Global Ethic from the Sources of Judaism (SkyLight Paths). He is a contributor to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (both Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Elie Kaunfer, DHL, is cofounder and executive director of Mechon Hadar (www.mechonhadar.org). He holds a doctorate in liturgy and is the author of Empowered Judaism: What Independent Minyanim Can Teach Us about Building Vibrant Jewish Communities. He is a contributor to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights). Newsweek named him one of fifty top rabbis in America.

Rabbi Reuven Kimelman, PhD, is professor of classical Judaica at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. He is the author of The Mystical Meaning of Lekha Dodi and Kabbalat Shabbat and of the audio books The Moral Meaning of the Bible and The Hidden Poetry of the Jewish Prayerbook. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and to the My People’s Prayer Book volumes P’sukei D’zimrah (Morning Psalms) and Kabbalat Shabbat (Welcoming Shabbat in the Synagogue) (all Jewish Lights).

Dr. Mark L. Kligman is professor of Jewish musicology at Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion in New York, where he teaches in the School of Sacred Music. He specializes in the liturgical traditions of Middle Eastern Jewish communities and various areas of popular Jewish music. Dr. Kligman is an adjunct professor at Columbia University and Rutgers University, the academic chair of the Jewish Music Forum, and coeditor of the journal Musica Judaica. He has published on the liturgical music of Syrian Jews in Brooklyn in journals as well as his book Maqām and Liturgy: Ritual, Music and Aesthetics of Syrian Jews in Brooklyn, which shows the interconnection between the music of Syrian Jews and their cultural way of life.

Rabbi Noa Kushner is founding rabbi of The Kitchen. One part indie Shabbat community, one part San Francisco experiment, and one part tool kit for DIY Jewish practice, The Kitchen works to build a new resonant approach to religious life. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Daniel Landes is the director and rosh hayeshivah of the Pardes Institute of Jewish Studies in Jerusalem. Pardes brings together men and women of all backgrounds to study classical Jewish texts and contemporary Jewish issues in a rigorous, challenging, and open-minded environment. Rabbi Landes is also a contributor to the My People’s Prayer Book: Traditional Prayers, Modern Commentaries series, winner of the National Jewish Book Award; My People’s Passover Haggadah: Traditional Texts, Modern Commentaries, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award; Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef; All These Vows—Kol Nidre; We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet; and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Asher Lopatin is the president of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah Rabbinical School, an Orthodox rabbinical school that teaches an inclusive, open, and inquisitive Torah. He is the former rabbi of Anshe Sholom B’nai Israel Congregation, a modern Orthodox synagogue in Chicago, and is a founding rabbi of the multidenominational Chicago Jewish Day School. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef (Jewish Lights).

Catherine Madsen is the author of The Bones Reassemble: Reconstituting Liturgical Speech; In Medias Res: Liturgy for the Estranged; and a novel, A Portable Egypt. She is librettist for Robert Stern’s oratorio “Shofar” (on the CD Awakenings, Navona Records NV5878), and bibliographer at the Yiddish Book Center. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Jonathan Magonet, PhD, is emeritus professor of Bible at Leo Baeck College in London, where he was principal (president) from 1985 to 2005. He is coeditor of three volumes of Forms of Prayer (the prayer books of the British Movement for Reform Judaism) and editor of the eighth edition of Daily, Sabbath and Occasional Prayers. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Dalia Marx, PhD, is a professor of liturgy and midrash at the Jerusalem campus of Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion and teaches in various academic institutions in Israel and Europe. Rabbi Marx earned her doctorate at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and her rabbinic ordination at HUC–JIR in Jerusalem and Cincinnati. She is involved in various research groups and is active in promoting progressive Judaism in Israel. Rabbi Marx contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights). She writes for academic journals and the Israeli press, and is engaged in creating new liturgies and midrashim.

Ruth Messinger is the president of American Jewish World Service (AJWS). She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Charles H. Middleburgh, PhD, is the director of studies at Leo Baeck College in London, where he has taught since 1984. He is coeditor with Rabbi Andrew Goldstein, PhD, of the Liberal Judaism Machzor Ruach Chadashah and the anthologies High and Holy Days: A Book of Jewish Wisdom and A Jewish Book of Comfort. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Jay Henry Moses is director of the Wexner Heritage Program at the Wexner Foundation. Previously, he served for five years as associate rabbi at Temple Sholom of Chicago. Rabbi Moses has taught at Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion, the Jewish Community Center in Manhattan and its Makom: Center for Mindfulness, and in many other adult education settings. He contributed to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (both Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Rachel Nussbaum is rabbi and executive director of the Kavana Cooperative in Seattle, Washington. She was ordained at The Jewish Theological Seminary of America and was awarded an Avi Chai Fellowship for her innovative approach to Jewish community building. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef (Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Jack Riemer, well-known author and speaker, has conducted many workshops and seminars to help people learn about the inspiring tradition of ethical wills and to prepare their own. As head of the National Rabbinic Network, a support system for rabbis across denominational lines, he gives sermon seminars to rabbis throughout the United States. He is editor of The World of the High Holy Days and Wrestling with the Angel, and coeditor of So That Your Values Live On: Ethical Wills and How to Prepare Them (Jewish Lights). He contributed to May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Jeffrey K. Salkin, DMin, is a noted author whose work has appeared in many publications, including the Wall Street Journal, Reader’s Digest, and the Forward. He is editor of The Modern Men’s Torah Commentary: New Insights from Jewish Men on the 54 Weekly Torah Portions and Text Messages: A Torah Commentary for Teens; and author of Being God’s Partner: How to Find the Hidden Link Between Spirituality and Your Work, the bestseller Putting God on the Guest List: How to Reclaim the Spiritual Meaning of Your Child’s Bar or Bat Mitzvah, and Righteous Gentiles in the Hebrew Bible: Ancient Role Models for Sacred Relationships (all Jewish Lights), among other books. He contributed to We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Marc Saperstein, PhD, formerly principal of Leo Baeck College, currently serves as professor of Jewish history and homiletics at Leo Baeck College and as professor of Jewish studies at King’s College London. Previously he taught for twenty-nine years at three leading American universities. He has published four books on the sermon as source for Jewish history and culture, and contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Dennis C. Sasso, DMin, has been senior rabbi of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck since 1977. He lectures worldwide on Caribbean and Central American Sephardic Jewry and teaches about Reconstructionism and on interfaith relations. He serves on the board of directors for the United Way of Central Indiana, the Greater Indianapolis Progress Committee, and the Lake Family Institute for Faith and Giving of the IUPUI Center on Philanthropy. He is affiliate professor of Jewish studies at Christian Theological Seminary (Disciples of Christ).

Rabbi Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, DMin, is rabbi emerita of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck in Indianapolis, where she has served for thirty-six years, and director of the Religion, Spirituality, and Arts Initiative at Butler University in partnership with Christian Theological Seminary. She is the author of award-winning children’s books, including God’s Paintbrush and Shema in the Mezuzah: Listening to Each Other, winner of the National Jewish Book Award (both Jewish Lights); and Creation’s First Light, a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. Her book for adults is Midrash: Reading the Bible with Question Marks. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Jonathan P. Slater, DMin, was ordained at The Jewish Theological Seminary of America and has a doctor of ministry degree from the Pacific School of Religion. He is the author of Mindful Jewish Living: Compassionate Practice and A Partner in Holiness: Deepening Mindfulness, Practicing Compassion and Enriching Our Lives through the Wisdom of R. Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev’s Kedushat Levi. He is also codirector of programs at the Institute for Jewish Spirituality as well as an instructor in meditation at the JCC in Manhattan and other venues. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, and We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi David A. Teutsch, PhD, is the Wiener Professor of Contemporary Jewish Civilization and director of the Center for Jewish Ethics at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, where he served as president for nearly a decade. He was editor in chief of the seven-volume Kol Haneshamah prayer book series. His book A Guide to Jewish Practice: Everyday Living (RRC Press) won the National Jewish Book Award for Contemporary Jewish Life and Practice. He is also author of Spiritual Community: The Power to Restore Hope, Commitment and Joy (Jewish Lights) and several other books. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Margaret Moers Wenig, DD, teaches liturgy and homiletics at Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion in New York and is rabbi emerita of Beth Am, The People’s Temple. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Rabbi Daniel G. Zemel is the senior rabbi of Temple Micah in Washington, D.C. He contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

Dr. Wendy Zierler is professor of modern Jewish literature and feminist studies at Hebrew Union College–Jewish Institute of Religion, New York. She is editor with Rabbi Carole Balin and translator of To Tread on New Ground: The Selected Writings of Hava Shapiro (forthcoming) and Behikansi atah (Shapiro’s collected writings, in the original/Hebrew). She is also author of And Rachel Stole the Idols and the feminist Haggadah commentary featured in My People’s Passover Haggadah: Traditional Texts, Modern Commentaries (Jewish Lights), a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. She contributed to Who by Fire, Who by Water—Un’taneh Tokef, All These Vows—Kol Nidre, We Have Sinned: Sin and Confession in Judaism—Ashamnu and Al Chet, and May God Remember: Memory and Memorializing in Judaism—Yizkor (all Jewish Lights).

 

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